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April 03, 2011

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Retro Jordans

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chicopanther

You've no doubt heard the old saying that "The Marines are a department of the Navy--the Men's Department." That is especially true now.

chicopanther

Ninja R

You touched a subject I've been complaining about since I got involved in the netherworld of advertising -- money spent on it.

It's insane how much these guys get paid for sitting around thinking up new ad campaigns. The Navy's advertising has been worse than broken for over a decade; they're still trying to find their place and a cohesive message that doesn't change every two or three years.

Everyone knows the Marines' slogan. Most know the Army's slogans. No one knows much of anything about the Navy because of their schizophrenic advertising methods.

A Global Force For Good...to the tune of $800 million. Wonder how many rounds that could have bought.

I don't mind the new slogan so much. At least it's not "A Global Force For Change."

The Marine Corps' advertising is effective because it appeals to a certain type of person.

Folks like us would definitely want to appeal to people's patriotism and sense of country as a reason to enlist. Unfortunately, that'll take a complete revision of much of the nation's collective conscience. Kids have a sense of it, but they don't really know why or how it got there. I can't blame the Navy -- or any company (for these purposes, the services are a business with a product to sell) for appealing to that which people will identify.

Of course, old salts from the Navy will be pissed about the campaign. They're different than civilians. They know more about their service and they know what it means. Kids don't know anything about it except maybe some old stories from their grandparents' Vietnam service -- those who'll talk about it, at least.

If I was recruiting people who were already enlisted, of course the advertising campaign would be geared more toward them...but it ain't.

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